When Metro Fails

Here’s a great example of a fail, in my opinion, of a Metro design.  It’s the installer for Wix Toolset:

wix1

This is a Metro looking starting screen, and it took me probably 15 seconds to figure out where I was supposed to click to install the toolset.

First issue: What’s with all the red?  This means I should be paying attention to something, right?

Second issue: What the heck is this screen?  I was expecting a standard install screen.

Third issue: Now what?  What am I supposed to do?  The icons are meaningless to me.  Oh wait, maybe I should read that teansie-weansie text for each of the boxes.

Fourth issue: Ah, there is “Install” in a tiny font.

Really, just because Microsoft says “Metro” doesn’t mean we all need to jump like automatons, does it?  And if you think Metro is the right way to go, please, please, design something that actually is intuitive.

Further Failures

After clicking on “Install”, I note the following further failures:

  1. The entry on my Window’s taskbar shows an icon that I can only assume is from Wix with no text.  wix2That’s helpful.
  2. The installation starts with a spinning “gear” – I have no idea what it’s doing.
  3. A lot of meaningless file information eventually flashes by, too fast to read, too long to fit on the screen.
  4. The progress bar (if you can figure out that the darker red is a progress bar) jumps right, left, right, left, like a spastic hamster
  5. After it’s completed, the first screenshot still stays there.  Now what?  I guess I should click on “Exit”?

That my 2c.

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This entry was posted in Coding Horrors, Critiques, Rants, Software Development. Bookmark the permalink.

One Response to When Metro Fails

  1. Richard says:

    To be fair, I don’t think I’ve ever seen a Windows Installer progress bar that *doesn’t* jump around like a spastic hamster.

    Either that, or it races through to “1 second remaining” and sits there for five minutes.

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