The Kademlia Protocol e-book Published!

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SyncFusion has published my e-book The Kademlia Protocol.  I sort of broke the mold here, typically SyncFusion e-books are around 100 pages — after formatting, this turned out to be 194 pages!

Get your free copy here!

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Steel – Blame the American Politicians

Trump tweeted: “Our Steel and Aluminum industries (and many others) have been decimated by decades of unfair trade and bad policy with countries from around the world.”

OK, yes, foreign governments like China subsidize their industries to undercut the cost of steel manufacturing.  But that’s not the whole story.  We have our own politicians to blame as well.  Read this (written in 2011!):

American Steal: How U.S. steelworkers lost to China

This [the weakening of the American steel industry] is occurring despite the existence of “buy American” laws governing major construction projects. The problem, as always, is Congress made compliance optional. If contractors wanted to buy American they could. If they wanted to buy from China or any other government that subsidizes its corporations, they were free to do so. Lawmakers had not been the least bit serious when they drafted the legislation.

Sadly, we have only ourselves to blame.

 

 

Code Review – What You Can Learn From a Single Line of Code

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(image credit – a good article)

My first article of 2018 has been posted on Code Project!

It never fails to surprise me what can be gleaned from a single line of code. Gone are the days of BASIC where each line did one thing, a print statement, a gosub or goto, if-then-elseif-end if. Nowadays, a single line of code can be a chain of method calls, LINQ expressions, and operators like ?: (ternary if-else), ?. (null continuation), ?? (null coalescing) and even if-then-else implemented as extension methods.

What we’ll look at here is what can be gleaned about the implementation from just one line of code.

Read more here.

Higher Order Programming on the Web is Alive

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A hard to read screenshot of HOPE (aka Semantic Computing) is now working on the web under the code name “Temporal Agency” (I love that name!), using:

  • Docker to isolate user projects and sessions
  • C# (Yay!)
  • DotNet Core 2.0 (Yay!)

Features:

  • IDE-style programming.
  • Syntax highlighting editor (courtesy of Ace).
  • Layout of results declared in XML.

This is very snazzy, in my humble opinion.  I have a couple demos working:

  • Weather forecast, tying in to UndergroundWeather, with summary (as shown above) and full forecast layouts.
  • Address verification using the USPS API’s.

More to come!